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The Get-Up: It Hinges on the Hinge

You could have a blog solely dedicated to the Turkish Get-up.  Granted, not many people would read it - besides myself, obviously - but there are so many intricacies and variations that it's hard to learn them all.  If you've been around kettlebells and heavy get-ups for any significant period of time, you know what I'm talking about.

(Unless, of course, your idea of a get-up is to stand up "any way possible."  Because that's a terrible idea.)

While StrongFirst has plenty of content on the difficult steps of the get-up, I'd like to highlight one of the more underutilized steps: the hinge. And if you a) are shaking your head vigorously in agreement, or b) had no idea there's a hinge in the get-up, you're going to want to read below.

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Strength, Trust, and Mental Toughness

Pavel Tsatsouline has written a great post on the relationship between mental toughness and strength. In short, the phrase "mental toughness" usually conjures up images of endurance - a marathoner on mile 20+, a cyclist battling the steep climbs of the Tour de France, or a boxer surviving the late rounds.  But Pavel argues that mental toughness is just as present during maximal expressions of strength.

And as someone who is notorious for my grind-it-out style of lifting - once performing an exhausting 14 second deadlift during a Tactical Strength Challenge - I conveniently fit Pavel's argument. :)

But I'd like to add to what Pavel has already written - mental toughness isn't only present during the attempt, it's most important before the attempt. In a sense, it's what goes on before the camera app is opened and Instagrams are posted.

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The Only Constants? PRs and Changes

If you've noticed I haven't been writing much lately - and judging from my web analytics, you haven't - you would be correct.  With only four blog posts through the last two months, it's fair to assume that my supply of humor (and intelligence) have finally been depleted. But self deprecating humor aside, the reason for the slowdown is because Lindsay and I are in the midst of a few life changes.

No, nothing that crazy.  But we are moving to Raleigh, North Carolina in just about a week. Lindsay has accepted a teaching position at NC State, in their Food and Nutrition Science department.  This comes on the heels of Lindsay successfully defending her dissertation two weeks ago, finishing her PhD program at Tufts in only 3 1/2 years.  I couldn't be prouder of her and I'm looking forward to writing "Mr. and Dr. Tanskey" on any wedding RSVPs.

 

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Making the Case for Heart Rate Based "Running"

Rather than a strength or physical preparation coach, I've recently taken to calling myself a "systems analyst."  I didn't come up with the term - it's borrowed from Dr. Stuart McGill - and I don't have the huevos to say it at a social gathering.  But it's always fun to pretend in the land of the internet.

Analyzing systems captures how I approach movement, conditioning, strength, and goals. Breaking down large topics to biomechanics, biology, and how it's all one big system, is usually met with positive feedback (even if it comes with a few "Office Space" jokes). But what's the one topic that tends to meet the most resistance?  How to increase one's running ability, because it's counter to what most people think.  

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